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Personal Learning Network (PLN)

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Educator in Oz

As far as career growth and personal growth, this week has been a huge stepping stone for me. My agenda for the week was to join a PLN—personal learning network. A personal learning network is an informal network environment with learner interactions upon a desired topic. I focused my PLN on general elementary education tied with early childhood development. With this, I had to find 100+ people on Twitter who would be reliable, educational, and beneficial to my learning. Having said that, I was a little anxious to follow 100 more people on Twitter, since I could barely even follow all 15 or so classmates. In the process of doing this, it was a realization to me how much Twitter is used for more than just sharing how good your sandwich is or how slow traffic is. Finding 100 people to follow on Twitter relating to education is like mining—you must chip away all the crap to get to the good stuff.

I’ve learned through social media that the best (and easiest) way to lurk and checkout desired learning content is through hashtag (#). By including a hashtag in your social media posts, it can access a whole new digital world! It allows other uses to view posts incorporated with the hash tag (topic) and to spark discussions and ideas (hence: PLN). One challenge I found while searching for users dedicated towards education is the accuracy of their dedication. Some had politics and other government-related matters that I didn’t care for; I was strictly there for educational purposes only. Another challenge I faced was how often the user posted. Since I’m newly very active on Twitter, I wanted resources that I could access every time I checked my Twitter feed, besides posting new content once a month.

With discovering that Twitter is such an eye-opening source, this gives me an opportunity to collaborate and involve myself in discussions that will only add to my professional knowledge. In the Twitter share I provided, @Gary P. Lambert implies what it takes to be a good leader—a good follower, on social media!

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Although finding the right Twitter users to follow, it taught me how to find the right ones to follow. I know what to look for; and that’s the same career passion that I have about education. Bloggers, teachers, administrators, homeschool teachers, all the works. The more experience and knowledge I’m available to will only better me and my career.

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4 thoughts on “Personal Learning Network (PLN)”

  1. I agree that it can be very tedious adding people to your account when not knowing who they are. I guess at future educators that is exactly our job, to find out who (students) they are. I don’t think it is going to be a simple task because every child is different meaning some are more closed off than others. I too want to become a better leader and educator. There is always room for improvement.
    Val

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  2. I too noticed that an easy way to find good content and people to add, it was easier to search through the hashtags on social media. I also added everybody that is part of my PLN into a list so I can see all of their twitter posts in one central location, it has really helped with efficacy when I am on a time crunch for social media. I also was nervous about following 100 extra people on social media. For me, it was more about being nervous that the content that was going to be tweeted wouldn’t be useful, but then I realized after reading articles and a dose of common sense, that I could refine, edit, and delete profiles that didn’t serve my purpose as I initially thought!
    Hillary

    Like

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